Becca Stacey, Senior Research Officer, Money and Mental Health Policy Institute

Why the next government needs to ‘level up’ for people with mental health problems

12 July 2022

鲍里斯·约翰逊(Boris Johnson)领导的政府可能已经接近尾声,但为英国各地“落后”的民众和社区“提升水平”的承诺比以往任何时候都更重要。Ournew reportpublished today reveals that existing levelling up plans have so far failed to address – or even recognise – the stark inequalities that people with mental health problems experience in many parts of the UK. In particular, our research highlights ‘inequality hotspots’, including Northern Ireland and the North West, where the economic gap between people with mental health problems and the wider population is particularly worrying.

下一任首相有机会填补这些差距,为有心理健康问题的人提供帮助。与此同时,地方领导人也有机会采取行动,减少本地区有精神健康问题的人所面临的不平等。我们的报告呼吁这两种力量共同建立一个英国,让有心理健康问题的人无论生活在哪里都能茁壮成长。

The UK’s mental health inequality hotspots

People with mental health problems are being left furthest behind in Northern Ireland and the North West. In Northern Ireland, people with mental health problems are 20 percentage points more likely to be struggling to keep up with bills and credit repayments compared to the wider population (72% versus 52% respectively), and in the North West, 18 percentage points more likely. This is in comparison to the West Midlands and London where that gap is much smaller – just 6 percentage points.

The fact that in some parts of the UK people with mental health problems can expect better outcomes shows these disadvantages are not inevitable. In our research, we’ve seen how, by providing the right opportunities and support, places can help people with mental health problems to be healthier, both financially and mentally.

Why are some places more unequal than others?

There is a toxic cocktail of factors – including poor employment opportunities, high living costs and limited access to vital support like mental health services and debt advice – driving these inequality hotspots:

Employment: Places like Northern Ireland and Wales appear to be less successful in supporting people with mental health problems to find and stay in work. In these places, the employment rate of people with mental health problems is over 40 percentage points lower than that of people without such conditions, compared to less than 25 percentage points in the East and South East of England. In many places, struggling to access adequate employment support is a key barrier to finding good work.

“我住在一个大工业区附近。所有以福利为基础的就业支持似乎都包括让员工在当地工厂担任全职的体力工作,不管这样做是否合适。There is no support locally for access to training, education, working from home etc.”Expert by experience

Living costs: The cost of key services in an area can contribute to or alleviate financial worries, with many people with mental health problems struggling to access affordable and good quality housing.

“Private rents are extortionate for sometimes poorly maintained or unsafe properties and there’s no chance of getting a council property.”Expert by experience

People also told us of the financial burden high council tax charges coupled with limited Council Tax support cause, and how patchy and expensive public transport leaves them with fewer choices for jobs, shopping and the activities that help us stay well mentally.

Getting support:When we experience money and mental health problems, getting support – such as accessible mental health treatment, assistance from financial services and debt advice – can be a lifeline. Despite this, the availability of services varies widely. For example, wait times for primary mental health services like talking therapies range from 12 days in East Yorkshire to 153 days in Barnsley, with the inability to access timely support often having a financial impact.

“Feel that speedier treatment would have nipped my symptoms in the bud and enabled me to keep working. Became so unwell I haven’t worked for 6 years.”Expert by experience

How to level-up the UK’s mental and financial health

Our research makes clear that the next Prime Minister must revamp plans for levelling up so they deliver for people with mental health problems, by implementing a series of targeted actions that tackle the challenges this group face. These include: introducing more specialist employment support for people with mental health problems, increasing the share of funding for genuinely affordable housing while reducing the discrepancy between private rents and housing support, and making people with mental health problems eligible for all concessionary travel schemes.

Local leaders also have an important role to play in tackling specific issues in their areas which are putting people with mental health problems at greater risk of financial difficulty. This could include: steps to make jobs and housing more accessible to people with mental health problems, improving the generosity and accessibility of Council Tax Support schemes, and measures to make local mental health and money advice services more joined-up.

To find out more about what different actors at the national, devolved and local level can do to level-up the UK’s mental and financial health, you can read our full report, No one left behind,here.